Pow Kernow 1
Land of Kernow: 1

an Kernowek/Kernewek

Me zavaz war an dreath ha meeras urt an gorroll broaz lean e golow gwidn. Thera golow caar tha pow orol neb o pel drez an moar. Me alga gwellhas whathe an deeze warnotha, ago dilladgow era spladna gen lewiow, rooz, gwidn, blou, gwear. War an gorroll thera leeaz dean, stennorion ha rerol, gen ago gwregeth hago flehaz. Thera oatham a stennorion than bala wheal en Ostralya Thehow. Mennow gorrollion golowe thurt porthow Kernow a kemeras caar stennorion ha teeze Gernooak erel tha powiow pel.

Na, rag angye nag eram whola. En edn vlethan meeliow a stennorion araz agon pow bean rag golow tha Ostralya. Na, na reeg an dacrow reeg resak thurt a lagadgow na reeg resak rag buz edn dean. Thera e war an gorroll teag na. Therava stennor aweeth era golow tha Ostralya rag dendel mear a vuna.

Lebma edn ower e am sendgaz et e thefra a paya a dewvoh gleab. Me vedn doaz arta, meth e. Na vadama tha nakevy. Gwra credge them. Perama doaz arta nye veath muna louare ha nye ell dimetha. Na oram an peath a reegam lavaral. Scone, pagee deez arta scone, theram credge. Nena e reza moaz.

An gwenz whetha tha greffa lebben ha tho an gorroll bean en peldar, a pooza en gwenz. Scone na ra buz armorow gwage kerras than dreath. Pezealla termen vetha ne ra an armorow na e thegge thubba arta. Rava doaz arta nevra.

Translation

I stood on the beach and watched the big ship with its white sails full. It was sailing to another country far away across the sea. I could still see the people on it, their clothes shining with colour: red, white, blue and green. On the ship there were many people, miners and others with their wives and children. The mines in South Australia needed men. Often ships sailed from the Cornish ports taking away miners and other Cornish people to far countries.

No. It was not for them that I was crying. In one year thousands of miners left our small country to sail to Australia. No, the tears which were flowing from my eyes were flowing for just one man. He was on that beautiful ship. He was a miner too who was sailing to Australia to earn a lot of money.

An hour ago he held me in his arms, kissing my wet cheeks. "I will come back", he said. "I won't forget you. Believe me. When I return we will have enough money and we will be able to get married". I don't know what I said. "Soon, please come back soon", I think. Then he had to go.

The wind was blowing more strongly now and the ship was small in the distance, leaning in the wind. Soon only empty waves would roll towards the beach. How long would it be until those waves would carry him here again? Would he ever return?

Vocabulary

The order of the words in the vocabulary follows their occurrence in the story. The letter (f) signifies that the noun is feminine. All nouns without a letter are masculine. Remember that the first letters of words in Celtic languages mutate to other letters in various situations.

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Cornish
English
Cornish
English
me
I
na reeg
not did
zavaz
stood
dacrow
tears
war
on
reeg resak
which flowed
an
the
a
my
treath (f)
beach
lagadgow
eyes
hag
and
na reeg resak buz
flowed only
meeras urt
to watch
thera e
he was
gorroll
ship
an ... na
that, those
broaz
big
teag
beautiful
lean
full
therava
he was
e
his, its
aweeth
too, also
golow
sails
era golow
who was sailing
gwidn
white
rag dendel
to earn
e
he, it
mear a
much, a lot of
thera golow caar
it was sailing away
muna
money
tha pow orol
to another land
lebma
ago, from here
neb o pel
which was far
ower
hour
drez
across
e
he
moar
sea
am
me
alga
could
sendgaz
held
gwellhas
to see
et e thefra
in his (two) arms
whathe
still, yet
a paya
kissing
an deeze
the people
a dewvoh
my (two) cheeks
warnotha
on him, on it
gleab
wet
ago
their
vedn
will
dilladgow
clothes
doaz
to come
era a spladna
which were shining
arta
again
gen
with
doaz arta
to return
lewiow
colours
meth e
he said
rooz
red
na vadama
I will not
blou
blou
tha
you
gwear
green
nakevy
to forget
thera
there was/were
gwra credge
believe!
leeaz
many
them
(to) me
dean
man, person
perama
when I will
stennorion
tinners, miners
nye
we
ha
and
veath
will have
rerol
others
louare
enough
gwregeth
wives
ell
can
hago
and their
dimetha
to marry
flehaz
children
na oram
I do not know
oatham
need
an peath a
what
a
of
reegam
I did
than
to/for the
lavaral
to say
bala wheal
mines
scone
soon
en
in
pagee
please
Ostralya (f)
Australia
deez
come!
dehow
south
deez arta
return!
mennow
often
theram
I am
gorrollion
ships
a credge
believing
golowe
would sail
nena
then
thurt
from
reza
had to
porthow
ports
moaz
to go
Kernow (f)
(of) Cornwall
gwenz
wind
a kemeras caar
taking away
whetha
was blowing
teeze
men, people
tha greffa
more strongly
Kernooak
Cornish
lebben
now
erel
other
tho
was
tha
to
en peldar
in the distance
powiow
lands
a pooze
leaning
pel
far
na ra
will not
na
no
buz
but
rag
for (the sake of)
armorow
waves
angye
them, they
gwage
empty
nag eram
I was not
kerras
to walk, to travel
en whola
crying, in tears
pezealla termen
how long?
edn
one
vetha
will it be?
blethan (f)
year
ne
until
meeliow
thousands
ra ... degge
will carry
stennor
tinner, miner
an ... na
that, those
araz
left
e
him, it
agon
our
thubba
hither, to here
pow
land, country
rava doaz
will he come?
bean
small
nevra
ever
rag golow
to sail
   

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