Flowren in y Blew
Flowers in Her Hair

an Kernowek/Kernewek

Hy a threhevas y fen hag hanaga.

--- Na Revrond, y myth, Ny raf wherthin nefra. Ny yllaf. Me a ovyn worth ow honyn stella fatell vea an floh hethow, pemp blowth, lymyn ow talleth bewa. Mas ny yll travyth defalyby an pith a ve gwrys. Ny vynsan gara then floh bos genys, hager dra, ha lymyn ny yllaf gava ow honyn. In della theso ge y thoff devethys. Ny ylla nagonyn ken gweras thym.

An den coth a vynwherthas.

--- Powes lymyn ha me a bys thys, chyl vean, y myth.

Hy a bowesas in gader ha keas y lagasow. An howl a splanna in ebron las heb commoll hag oll in dro thesa tros ythen ha can an govar esa ow resak in dan an gweth vhell gwyr in luar teg. Nena hy a wellas an ell esa ow powes warbyn carrack looes bras, ow mynwherthin thethy hag in dro thy dreys mos vean a worollyas, craysy in y dewleff ha flowren erell, blu ha roos aga lew, a dro thy fen. Lene a varth hy a wherthas ha nena hy a wherthas arta, pan rug crys cotha a thysempyas warnothy. An vos vean a hethas downsya haga vynwherthas haga leverys wheg then ell repthy:

--- Myr, Mehall. Y ma Mam ow wherthin. Dar nyns ew da henna.

Hy a ageras y lagasow, an wherthin war y gwelavennow whath ha lowena in y begeth. Awosa polgy bean hy a vyras in ban in lagasow fur an den coth esa ow vinwherthin cossoll thethy.

--- Gwra merci Revrond. Y thoff per tha lymyn ha me a vyn bos stella.

Translation

She raised her head and sighed.

"No, Reverend", she said, "I never laugh. I cannot. I ask myself all the time how would the child be today, five years old, just beginning to live. But nothing can change what was done. I would not let the child be born, a terrible thing, and now I can't forgive myself. So I have come to you. There is no-one else who can help me."

The old man smiled. "Just rest and I will pray for you, my child", he said.

She rested in the chair and closed her eyes. The sun shone in a cloudless blue sky and all around there was the sound of birds and the song of a brook which flowed beneath the tall green trees in the beautiful garden. Then she saw the angel leaning against a great grey rock, smiling at her, and around his feet a little girl was dancing, flowers like celandine in her hands and other flowers, blue and red, around her head. Full of wonder she laughed and then laughed again as peace fell suddenly onto her. The little girl stopped dancing and smiled and said to the angel beside her:

"Look, Michael. Mother is laughing. Isn't that good?"

She opened her eyes, the laugh still on her lips, and joy in her face. In a little while she looked up into the wise eyes of the old man who was smiling gently at her.

"Thank you, Reverend. I am very well now and I will be always."

Vocabulary

The order of the words in the vocabulary follows their occurrence in the story. The letter (f) signifies that the noun is feminine. All nouns without a letter are masculine. Remember that the first letters of words in Celtic languages mutate to other letters in various situations.

If you have trouble printing this vocabulary listing print this page.

CornishEnglishCornishEnglish
threhevas
raised, lifted
vhell
tall, high
pen
head
gwyr
green
hanaga
to sigh
teg
beautiful
Revrond
Reverend
ell
angel
y myth
said
in powes warbedn
leaning against
na
no
carrack (f)
rock
wherthin
to laugh
looes
grey
nefra
never
bras
big, large, great
ny yllaf
I can not
mynwherthin tha
to smile at
wovyn worth
ask
thethy
at her
ow honyn
myself
in dro the
around his
stella
always
treys
feet
fatell
how
bean
small
vea
would be
gorollya
to play, to dance
floh
child
flowren kepar ha
flowers like
blowth
years old
craysy
celandine
dalleth
to begin
in y dewleff
in her hands
bewa
to live
flowren
flowers
yll(a)
can
erell
other, else
traveeth
nothing
blu
blue
defalyby
to change
roos
red
an pith
what
aga
their
ve gwrys
was done
lew
colour
vynsan
I would
in dro thy fen
around her head
gara the
to let
lene
full
genys
born
marth
wonder, surprise
hager
terrible
wherthas
laughed
tra (f)
thing
arta
again
gava
to forgive
pan rug
when .... did
in della
thus, so
crys
peace
theso ge
to you
cotha
to fall
thoff devethys
I have come
a thysempyas
suddenly
nagonen
no ­ one
warnothy
on her
ken
else
hethy
to stop, to cease
gweras tha
to help
downsya
to dance
coth
old
leverell
to say
vinwherthas
smiled
wheg
sweet(ly)
powes
rest!
repthy
beside her
bys
pray
myr
look!
chyl vean
my child
Mehall
Michael
bowesas
rested
Mam
Mother
cader (f)
chair
da
good
keas
to close, to shut
hena
that
lagasow
eyes
agery
to open
howl
sun
an wherthin
the laugh
splanna
to shine
gwelavennow
lips
ebron
sky
whath
still, yet
glas
blue, green, grey
lowena
joy
heb
without
begeth
face
commoll
cloud
awosa polgy bean
after a little while
oll in dro
all around
myras in ban
to look up
thesa
there was
fur
wise
troze
sound
esa
was, were
ythen
birds
cossoll
gentle, gently
can
song
thethy
at her
govar
stream, brook
per tha
very well
resak
to slip, to flow, to run
vyn bos
will be
in dan
under
stella always

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